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Posted by
Henagon

How to access a Mac after it reboots

I've searched the archive and found no updates to this issue. How do I configure TeamViewer on a Mac so that the machine is available for TV login after it reboots? Note, the iMac has multiple users and requires a user to login after a reboot. Every time the iMac reboots, typically after autoinstalling a system update, I lose remote access to the machine. 

I sure hope this is as simple as a checkbox that I have yet to discover. 

1 Accepted Solution

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
Posted by
Digon
Solution

Re: How to access a Mac after it reboots

@djcrone 

Howdy, 

Although the other person  @Vatsilidis was correct in showing you the link regarding the initial setup of TeamViewer on the newer macOS versions (10.14 Mojave & 10.15 Catalina), that require specifically manually ALLOWING access via System preference settings on the remote computer, ie: granting permission in System Preferences -> Security & Privacy -> Privacy, where you can then click on each of the 3 : Screen Recording, Accessibility, and Full Disk Access

"If you or others need to access the Mac remotely, Screen Recording and Accessibility are required at a minimum."

Full disk access is nice, especially if you need to exchange files with the remote computer, but not required for screen control.

However, I think they missed your actual question regarding your issue of not being able to connect to the Macintosh computer after a reboot:
"I sure hope this is as simple as a checkbox that I have yet to discover."

Yes, indeed, there is a simple checkbox, that _normally_ will allow you to reconnect even after a reboot, even if only the login screen is displayed.

Presuming that you're talking about installing TeamViewer Host on the client computer you wish to remote control, indeed, look into the TeamViewer Host preferences, then click upon the 'Advanced' tab, and there locate and check the checkbox that says : "Full access control when a partner is connecting to the login window".

That's the simple checkbox you've been looking for.

Now, having said that, there may be some other issues that may prevent you from accessing the computer, including, as you noticed, after macOS system software updates, this can sometimes cause TeamViewer to loose it's connectivity. I've also noticed this happen even after some TeamViewer Host updates (updates of the TeamViewer software itself).

There is also the possibility that if that computer has 'FileVault' enabled, I'm not sure, but perhaps as that has a kinda special pre-login window, for enhanced security, that perhaps that might also prevent TeamViewer from having remote control access, I'm not certain on that.

This link seems to indicate that FileVault would prevent TeamViewer :
https://community.teamviewer.com/t5/General-Questions/TeamViewer-host-does-not-run-before-login-on-m...

Regarding:
"Note, the iMac has multiple users and requires a user to login after a reboot. Every time the iMac reboots, typically after autoinstalling a system update, I lose remote access to the machine.

So, yes, this is why you may wish to seriously consider this: you can disable macOS auto-updates, and also even TeamViewer auto-updates, as either one or both could potentially break your ability to access the remote computer.

It's not a bad idea, as generally for businesses, it's more important to have solid robust reliable computers, and ONLY planned updates/upgrades when needed or appropriate, and not during work/business hours, etc... Auto-updates are nice for some purposes, but can also be horrible for other circumstances, and may be better planned out when on-site, with a secondary method available to you just in case, or with a person there on site-you can have manually login and type things while you speak over the phone, etc...

Also, on this note, it's sometimes helpful to have a secondary method to access the computer if possible, for example, if the computer is on a LAN network with other computers that you also access, you can setup the Macintosh computer for "Remote Management" in System Preferences -> Sharing, so that you could, for example, remote control another Mac computer on their LAN, and then, use Apples built in screen sharing to access the computer that you've allowed 'Remote Management' for with Apples built in tools, and then login that way, and fix the problems.

All of these methods may fail however, if FileVault is in place.
There may be workarounds to this, called "Authenticated Restart", which I'm not yet personally familiar with, as I've never tried or tested:
https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-restart-a-filevault-protected-mac-remotely/
and:
https://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/217673/headless-mac-mini-share-screen-filevault
and this:
https://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/275534/downsides-of-encrypting-disk-with-filevault

View solution in original post

6 Replies
Highlighted
Posted by TeamViewer Star
TeamViewer Star

Re: How to access a Mac after it reboots

Hi @djcrone 

The correct way to use a macOS device is first to adjust the screen recording and the other settings described in this related post.

The reboot is better to make it by the top toolbar commands, in order to not lose the connection.

The fact that the macOS every time wants to install an update after the reboot, is not a sign of a stable operating system. You have to figure out what stops the updates to be performed as should be or if these updates are from the Apple or by third app developers. 

Best regards

Pro
2 Replies
Highlighted
Posted by
Henagon

Re: How to access a Mac after it reboots

Thanks for your reply. I'd love to check out the related reply you mentioned. Can you provide the link for that?  

 

 

Highlighted
Posted by TeamViewer Star
TeamViewer Star

Re: How to access a Mac after it reboots

Here it is about macOS control, please open this link.

Sorry I didn't linked the previous post.

Best regards

Pro
Highlighted
Posted by
Digon
Solution

Re: How to access a Mac after it reboots

@djcrone 

Howdy, 

Although the other person  @Vatsilidis was correct in showing you the link regarding the initial setup of TeamViewer on the newer macOS versions (10.14 Mojave & 10.15 Catalina), that require specifically manually ALLOWING access via System preference settings on the remote computer, ie: granting permission in System Preferences -> Security & Privacy -> Privacy, where you can then click on each of the 3 : Screen Recording, Accessibility, and Full Disk Access

"If you or others need to access the Mac remotely, Screen Recording and Accessibility are required at a minimum."

Full disk access is nice, especially if you need to exchange files with the remote computer, but not required for screen control.

However, I think they missed your actual question regarding your issue of not being able to connect to the Macintosh computer after a reboot:
"I sure hope this is as simple as a checkbox that I have yet to discover."

Yes, indeed, there is a simple checkbox, that _normally_ will allow you to reconnect even after a reboot, even if only the login screen is displayed.

Presuming that you're talking about installing TeamViewer Host on the client computer you wish to remote control, indeed, look into the TeamViewer Host preferences, then click upon the 'Advanced' tab, and there locate and check the checkbox that says : "Full access control when a partner is connecting to the login window".

That's the simple checkbox you've been looking for.

Now, having said that, there may be some other issues that may prevent you from accessing the computer, including, as you noticed, after macOS system software updates, this can sometimes cause TeamViewer to loose it's connectivity. I've also noticed this happen even after some TeamViewer Host updates (updates of the TeamViewer software itself).

There is also the possibility that if that computer has 'FileVault' enabled, I'm not sure, but perhaps as that has a kinda special pre-login window, for enhanced security, that perhaps that might also prevent TeamViewer from having remote control access, I'm not certain on that.

This link seems to indicate that FileVault would prevent TeamViewer :
https://community.teamviewer.com/t5/General-Questions/TeamViewer-host-does-not-run-before-login-on-m...

Regarding:
"Note, the iMac has multiple users and requires a user to login after a reboot. Every time the iMac reboots, typically after autoinstalling a system update, I lose remote access to the machine.

So, yes, this is why you may wish to seriously consider this: you can disable macOS auto-updates, and also even TeamViewer auto-updates, as either one or both could potentially break your ability to access the remote computer.

It's not a bad idea, as generally for businesses, it's more important to have solid robust reliable computers, and ONLY planned updates/upgrades when needed or appropriate, and not during work/business hours, etc... Auto-updates are nice for some purposes, but can also be horrible for other circumstances, and may be better planned out when on-site, with a secondary method available to you just in case, or with a person there on site-you can have manually login and type things while you speak over the phone, etc...

Also, on this note, it's sometimes helpful to have a secondary method to access the computer if possible, for example, if the computer is on a LAN network with other computers that you also access, you can setup the Macintosh computer for "Remote Management" in System Preferences -> Sharing, so that you could, for example, remote control another Mac computer on their LAN, and then, use Apples built in screen sharing to access the computer that you've allowed 'Remote Management' for with Apples built in tools, and then login that way, and fix the problems.

All of these methods may fail however, if FileVault is in place.
There may be workarounds to this, called "Authenticated Restart", which I'm not yet personally familiar with, as I've never tried or tested:
https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-restart-a-filevault-protected-mac-remotely/
and:
https://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/217673/headless-mac-mini-share-screen-filevault
and this:
https://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/275534/downsides-of-encrypting-disk-with-filevault

View solution in original post

Highlighted
Posted by
Henagon

Re: How to access a Mac after it reboots

Yes, thank you for getting back to the initial question. I'll look for that specific checkbox when I am on site tomorrow morning. Fingers crossed that I simply missed that one. Interesting description of the function. I'm pretty sure I would not have checked that based on the language. 

FYI, on the iMac preferences, I did check the box to have it restart in case of power failure. 

While I appreciate the wisdom of not allowing auto-updates, I made the choice to enable that in this case as this machine (and its twin) typically only have someone physically sitting at them on Sunday mornings when they are used to project media onto the screens during church services. My goal in using TeamViewer is to make it so the small number of us who create the content being displayed do not need to physically drive into the church during the week to do that. Without getting into too many details, the application being used to do these projections is not conducive to creating the content offline or on a different device and bringing a thumb drive, or even using Dropbox or equivalent. There are specific settings on the machine that make it so that you really need to be on the actual computer (directly or via TV style remote) when you create it all. 

I love your secondary access concept. A remote access to get to remote access... I like it. And since there are two machines, as long as one of them is reachable via TV, I should be in good shape.

 

Thank you for your details response. 

 

Highlighted
Posted by
Digon

Re: How to access a Mac after it reboots

@djcrone 

Sure thing. Glad you've got the option for a 2nd computer, as that can really help! you may wish to also consider disabling auto-updates, and only do them when it's a good safe time to do so, say, once a month, or every 3 months, or whatever. 

 

Also, I'll try to attach a screen shot of the setting I was referring to for "the TeamViewer Host preferences, then click upon the 'Advanced' tab, and there locate and check the checkbox that says : "Full access control when a partner is connecting to the login window"TV settings.png